DIY Faux Vintage Picture Frame

Every now and then I like to apply my paints to something other than paper and test my craftiness. So when a friend of mine asked for a frame to go with the painting she ordered, I knew [almost] immediately that I wanted to make one. (Partly a result of having a mental image of what I wanted and not being able to find it...) The soft colors and sweet beachy theme of the bouquet/wedding called for a rustic, vintage, Shabby Chic-style frame. Here's how you can make your own!

Supplies:

- a frame in the color you want to show through (I bought this one)

- white acrylic paint

- sponge paintbrush

- coarse or extra coarse sandpaper (very important!)

*Full disclosure, I 100% winged this. You may find a better way; if you do, let me know!

Some tutorials will recommend that you sand the frame first, but I didn't find that was necessary. So step one - after taking off the back and removing the glass - is paint! I ended up layering 3 coats on all sides with the sponge brush just to cover the grain. This may take a couple of days depending on the amount of time you have to work on it.

 Be sure to lay down some newspaper or packing paper to cover your surface. Since you're painting the whole thing, paint is bound to get on something. :)

Be sure to lay down some newspaper or packing paper to cover your surface. Since you're painting the whole thing, paint is bound to get on something. :)

After the paint is completely dry (as in no longer tacky), use a sheet of coarse or extra coarse sandpaper and start roughing up all the edges. The coarseness is important; I tried it with a finer grain to begin with and it didn't even make a scratch on the thick acrylic paint. You want some of the original frame peeking through the layered paint.

 When it comes to choosing where to rub the paint off, consider where paint would naturally wear down over time: corners, raised bevels, etc. The best part of DIY projects, though, is putting your own spin on it!

When it comes to choosing where to rub the paint off, consider where paint would naturally wear down over time: corners, raised bevels, etc. The best part of DIY projects, though, is putting your own spin on it!

And there you have it! Since I was going for a sand-blown beach look for this bouquet painting, I kept it pretty simple with a lot of white and softly rubbed edges. But this could get way more rustic and worn depending on your tastes and what is being framed. 

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What would you put in this DIY frame?